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St Thomas More Catholic Primary School

Inspiration, Celebration and Education

English

English at St Thomas More Catholic Primary School

 

Intent

The National Curriculum (2014) forms the basis for all teaching, ensuring continuity and progression throughout our curriculum. Teachers at St Thomas More make sure the content is relevant and stimulating by delivering lessons related to engaging books and relevant topics. Our English curriculum has been developed to recognise the importance of English in every aspect of daily life and to develop children’s love of reading, writing, speaking and listening. We aim to create a school where children love to read, take pride in their writing and can speak aloud confidently. 

 

Our intent is to unsure children leave our school being able to:

• Read easily, fluently and with good understanding for pleasure and for information

• Write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences

• Develop a love of writing and to be able to express their thoughts and ideas clearly and creatively.

• Confidently use the essential skills of grammar, punctuation and spelling

• Develop oracy skills, understanding unfamiliar words and using them in context.

• Use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to give their opinions and build on other peoples suggestions.

• Become confident speakers and listeners, making formal presentations, being involved in performances and liturgies.

 

Implementation of writing

 

At St Thomas More Catholic Primary School we take our reading and writing objectives from the National Curriculum. We use these objectives to plan engaging, experiential, fun lessons. Each block of writing taught starts with an experience e.g. a book, visitor, letter or trip. The pupils then show us what they already know about the text type by completing a 'cold' write. From this children will be then taught the skills needed to write a particular text type, following a similar Do it, Twist it and Deepen it style of questions that we use in maths. This could be a story, non-chronological report or persuasive letter. The children will then plan, write a part each day to end up with an extended piece of writing, edit and publish their work. Every two weeks the children will then have the opportunity to show us what they have learnt through a ‘Big Write’. This is an independent piece of writing which will be used to build up evidence for assessments. Developing oracy skills plays a big part in the teaching of writing and we encourage our pupils to say what they are going to write before they put pen to paper. We also dedicate an RE session to oracy and this has greatly improved the outcomes of the written RE session.

Our fantastic writing Spring 2021

Writing displays Spring 2021

Implementation of reading

 

Phonics Screening and reading in EYFS and Key Stage 1


The national phonics screening check was introduced in 2012 to all Y1 pupils.  It is a short, statutory assessment to confirm whether individual pupils have learnt phonic decoding to an appropriate standard. It aims to identify the children who need extra help so that they can be given support by school to improve their reading skills.  At St Thomas More we already identify children and provide early intervention support, however  the assessment is a statutory requirement. The test comprises a list of 40 real and pseudo (nonsense) words, which a child will read one-to-one with the class teacher. Half the words cover phonic skills which are usually covered in Reception, and half the words are based on Year 1 phonics skills. Results are communicated to parents through the school report at the end of the academic year.

 

At St Thomas More the children have access to a wide range of fiction, non-fiction and poetry texts. Our main reading scheme is RWI, which is our phonics programme that we teach within school. Please take a look at the phonics link to read more about this area. The books children take home to read are linked with the colour books they will be reading in school.

Reading in Key Stage 2

 

In Key Stage Two the children at St Thomas More Catholic Primary School enjoy effective guided reading sessions. These sessions last for 30 minutes each day and the children are exposed to high quality texts such as The Hodgeheg, Charlotte's Web, James and the Giant Peach and Wonder. We are following a whole class reading approach where all children are involved in the reading, understanding and learning of new words. The whole group follow the text as an adult reads, discuss unusual words, use a dictionary, read themselves and then answer comprehension questions following the VIPERS questioning technique. Throughout the week, and particularly on a Tuesday session, we put a big emphasis on oracy skills. We identify unfamiliar words, investigate these words, write new definitions for them and orally put them into sentences. We feel this helps our pupils hugely with their comprehension skills and application of the new words in their writing.

VIPERS question examples

Reading Corners

 

To foster a love of reading every classroom at St Thomas More Catholic Primary School has a comfortable and well resourced reading corner. To read not only for understanding but pleasure, children are encouraged to choose a book and enjoy reading a variety of genres as well as their age appropriate reading book and guided reading book. Our reading corners are adapted each term to match the whole class guided reading book that the children are reading.

 

Reading areas and writing displays in Autumn 2021

Reading at home

 

All children take home a reading journal, along with their reading book, and this is a way of communicating with parents/carers about how well children are reading, how often and areas to work on. Pupils are encouraged to read at least 3 times a week and record this in their journal. Raffle tickets and rewards are given for reading at home.

 

School Library

 

To encourage a love of learning further, our recently refurbished library area has been restocked with a range of different books from a variety of genres, authors and cultures. This bright and welcoming communal area of space is enjoyed by many children whether in groups, for quiet reading or to even loan a special book linked to the classroom learning. Children across the school have the opportunity to borrow a book from the school library to keep in their drawers for use during guided reading.

 

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